Extreme Heat: A Prevention Guide to Promote Your Personal Health and Safety

July 18th, 2016

Though the elderly (65+), infants and children are more susceptible to heat stress, even the best conditioned of athletes can succumb to the health risks of hot weather.

In the last 25 years more people have died from extreme heat than from hurricanes, floods, tornadoes, lightning and earthquakes combined.

As simple as it seems, understanding how and why the body cools itself, when faced with extreme temperatures, is the key to staying healthy and preventing injuries and even death.

This well done and comprehensive pamphlet contains some valuable information, especially for those of you who live in areas where temperatures get into the 90’s and above.

From recognizing heat stroke, heat exhaustion heat cramps, heat rash and sunburn and what to do about them, the information is presented in an easy to understand and interesting format and something you may want to share with your family and friends.

According to the center for disease control:

Muscle cramping might be the first sign of heat-related illness, and may lead to heat exhaustion or stroke. Here is how you can recognize heat exhaustion and heat stroke and what to do:

Heat Exhaustion

  • Heavy sweating
  • Weakness
  • Cold, pale, and clammy skin
  • Fast, weak pulse
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Fainting
What You Should Do:

  • Move to a cooler location.
  • Lie down and loosen your clothing.
  • Apply cool, wet cloths to as much of your body as possible.
  • Sip water.
  • If you have vomited and it continues, seek medical attention immediately.
Heat Stroke

  • High body temperature (above 103°F)*
  • Hot, red, dry or moist skin
  • Rapid and strong pulse
  • Possible unconsciousness
What You Should Do:

  • Call 911 immediately — this is a medical emergency.
  • Move the person to a cooler environment.
  • Reduce the person’s body temperature with cool cloths or even a bath.
  • Do NOT give fluids.

Created by the Centers for Disease Control