DON’T START THE NEW YEAR WITH A CHAMPAGNE HEADACHE

December 28th, 2011

Champagne is a big part of many to New Year’s Eve celebrations. It can be a pleasure to drink, but it can also cause headaches for some. Headaches after drinking champagne may be caused by dehydration, mineral depletion or even an allergy to the sulfites in champagne. Sulfites are chemicals used as preservatives to inhibit browning and discoloration in foods and beverages during preparation, storage, and distribution. Sulfites have been used in wine making for centuries.

Sulfites are found in certain foods and beverages, and in a variety of medications. The use of sulfites as preservatives in foods and beverages increased dramatically in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Due to cases of severe reactions to sulfites, a ban by the FDA went into effect in August 1986. This ban prohibited use of sulfites in fresh fruits and vegetables. Sulfites continue to be used in potatoes, shrimp, and beer/wine, and are also used in the pharmaceutical industry.

 

TO AVOID HEADACHES AND HANGOVERS

TRY THESE TIPS:

 

STAY HYDRATED:

Drink more water. Alcohol is very dehydrating because it removes water from your cells, Try alternating a glass of water with each glass of champagne or other alcohol. And try to drink a full glass of water before going to bed.

 

TAKE ASPIRIN:

Taking some aspirin can help reduce some symptoms of a hangover such as a headache. Never take aspirin on an empty stomach as that could increase the risk of G.I. distress and nausea.

 

EAT CARBS:

Do not drink on an empty stomach.  Start with a light meal or snack of complex carbohydrates and protein that will help absorb the alcohol.

 

DRINK CAFFEINE:

Drink a few cups of coffee. The caffeine causes your blood vessels to constrict, which can relieve the discomfort of a headache. WARNING: FOR some migraine sufferers, caffeine can be a trigger. 

 

TRY MIGRELIEF:

MigreLief contains Magnesium, Feverfew, and Riboflavin (B-2), Multiple studies have demonstrated that these ingredients can reduce the frequency and intensity of migraine headaches in both adults and children.

 

 

Curt Hendrix, M.S., C.C.N., C.N.S.