Posts Tagged ‘feverfew for migraines’

Puracol Feverfew for Migraines – A Real Plus!

June 20th, 2017

The herb Feverfew (Tanacetum Parthenium) has been recorded as a medicinal remedy for millennia.  One can find references to the Latin “febrefugia” from which Feverfew gets its name in Old Saxon records. Hildegard of Bingen, a great 12th century abbess and healer made mention of it in her herbal tomes. Febrefugia literally means “Fever flies,” and has always been used as a fever reducer among other purposes. In even more ancient times, the Greeks used Feverfew to treat melancholy which was characterized as much by debilitating headaches as it was by long-term depression.

Historically Feverfew has also been used as a dietary supplement for headaches, constipation, diarrhea, and dizziness.   But one of the greatest boons in the modern era is the discovery of Feverfew as an aid for migraine headaches.

FEVERFEW & MIGRAINES

Commonly recommended for its ability to support cerebrovascular tone, Feverfew is rich in compounds known as sesquiterpene lactones.  One of the more important of these compounds is parthenolide, which represents 85% of the sesquiterpene lactone content in Feverfew. Some scientific studies indicate that while parthenolide may be important there may very well be other phytochemicals in Feverfew that are as of yet unidentified and play a role in its effectiveness.

PURACOL FEVERFEW
Some studies of extracts of feverfew containing parthenolide yielded no significant benefits. This led researchers to believe that some of the unidentified phytochemicals may have been left behind during the extraction process. The ideal solution would be a non-extracted feverfew product that naturally contained high levels of parthenolide AND kept all of the other naturally occurring phytochemicals as well. For this reason Puracol Feverfew (AKESO HEALTH SCIENCE’S proprietary non extracted plant source for feverfew with high levels of naturally occurring parthenolide) was developed. Puracol Feverfew is just one of the reasons for the superior efficacy of MigreLief, which delivers optimal dosages of parthenolide. Scientific studies have found parthenolide inhibits platelet aggregation and the release of serotonin from platelets and polymorphonuclear leukocyte granules.* It has also been shown to inhibit pro-inflammatory prostaglandin synthesis and the release of arachadonic acid. Each of these phenomena is associated with migraines. European studies have shown the benefits of feverfew on long-term cerebrovasular tone in multiple human studies.

INHIBITING BLOOD PLATELET AGGREGATION
Feverfew can help to prevent the clumping together of platelets in the blood – part of the sequence of events leading to the formation of a clot)

Over aggregating of platelets in the blood appear just before a migraine forcing a release of serotonin. Serotonin causes the blood vessel to constrict.  Scientific studies have found parthenolide inhibits platelet aggregation and the release of serotonin from platelets and polymorphonuclear leukocyte granules, thus keeping the blood vessel normal resulting in less painful, less frequent or cessation of migraines.

Feverfew has also been shown to inhibit pro-inflammatory prostaglandin synthesis and the release of arachadonic acid. Each of these phenomena is associated with migraines. European studies have shown the benefits of Feverfew on long-term cerebrovasular tone in multiple human studies.

ACTIVATING DYSFUNCTIONAL BRAIN PROCESSES
Though the exact cause of migraines is not known, certain triggers like tyramine in aged cheeses, chocolate, scents/perfumes, bright lights, changes in weather/temperature/humidity/altitude, over-use of headache medications, stress, hormonal fluctuations and many more, can activate certain processes that increase the risk of migraines occurring.

The dysfunctional processes that these triggers can activate are:

*  Excessive platelet aggregation which can result in changes in blood vessels associated with migraines.

*  Decrease in the cellular energy reserves in the brain that are common to migraine sufferers.

NUTRITIONAL APPROACH – When Migraine Sufferers Get These 3 Factors Under Control – The Results Can Be Life Changing

1.  Maintain normal platelet aggregation
2.  Reduce or eliminate vasospasms
3.  Maintain normal mitochondrial energy reserve in the brain.
A Nutritional Approach to Migraine Control:  Riboflavin, Magnesium and Feverfew for maintaining normal cerebrovascular function.
All 3 of these ingredients are listed in the American Academy of Neurology’s Guidelines for Migraine Prevention.

Magnesium:  Research studies show that almost half of all migraine sufferers have low blood levels of Magnesium, which is critical in controlling vasospasms (the contraction and dilation of blood vessels in the brain which occurs during migraines).

Riboflavin:  Migraine sufferers also suffer mitochondrial energy deficiencies, which Riboflavin (Vitamin B2) can improve when given in high dosages.

Feverfew:  Research studies show Feverfew inhibits blood platelet aggregation and is anti-inflammatory.

For adults and children over the age of 2 who suffer migraines chronically, this combination is a great place to start and is a good alternative to the chronic use of NSAIDs like aspirin, and ibuprofen without the negative side-effects.  You can find these formulas at MIGRELIEF.com

 

To the Best of Health,
Curt Hendrix, M.S., C.C.N., C.N.S.

MIGRELIEF.com

 

Feverfew for Migraines – A Real Plus!

March 21st, 2017

 

Peter Rabbit’s mother was on to something when she put him to bed with a cup of wild chamomile tea after he had been into Mr. McGregor’s garden. People in the modern world often think of chamomile as a sleep or digestive aid. But wild chamomile is another name for the herb Feverfew. A tea of feverfew would not only have relaxed the hapless rabbit, but would also have routed his headache, calmed his upset tummy, put his mind at ease and soothed his jangled nerves after his terrifying turn in the garden.

The herb Feverfew (Tanacetum Parthenium) has been recorded as a medicinal remedy for millennia.  One can find references to the Latin “febrefugia” from which Feverfew gets its name in Old Saxon records. Hildegard of Bingen, a great 12th century abbess and healer made mention of it in her herbal tomes. Febrefugia literally means “Fever flies,” and has always been used as a fever reducer among other purposes. In even more ancient times, the Greeks used Feverfew to treat melancholy which was characterized as much by debilitating headaches as it was by long-term depression.

Historically Feverfew has also been used as a dietary supplement for headaches, constipation, diarrhea, and dizziness.   But one of the greatest boons in the modern era is the discovery of Feverfew as an aid for migraine headaches.

FEVERFEW & MIGRAINES

Commonly recommended for its ability to support cerebrovascular tone, Feverfew is rich in compounds known as sesquiterpene lactones.  One of the more important of these compounds is parthenolide, which represents 85% of the sesquiterpene lactone content in Feverfew. Some scientific studies indicate that while parthenolide may be important there may very well be other phytochemicals in Feverfew that are as of yet unidentified and play a role in its effectiveness.

INHIBITING BLOOD PLATELET AGGREGATION
Feverfew can help to prevent the clumping together of platelets in the blood – part of the sequence of events leading to the formation of a clot)

Over aggregating of platelets in the blood appear just before a migraine forcing a release of serotonin. Serotonin causes the blood vessel to constrict.  Scientific studies have found parthenolide inhibits platelet aggregation and the release of serotonin from platelets and polymorphonuclear leukocyte granules, thus keeping the blood vessel normal resulting in less painful, less frequent or cessation of migraines.

Feverfew has also been shown to inhibit pro-inflammatory prostaglandin synthesis and the release of arachadonic acid. Each of these phenomena is associated with migraines. European studies have shown the benefits of Feverfew on long-term cerebrovasular tone in multiple human studies.


ACTIVATING
 DYSFUNCTIONAL BRAIN PROCESSES
Though the exact cause of migraines is not known, certain triggers like tyramine in aged cheeses, chocolate, scents/perfumes, bright lights, changes in weather/temperature/humidity/altitude, over-use of headache medications, stress, hormonal fluctuations and many more, can activate certain processes that increase the risk of migraines occurring.

The dysfunctional processes that these triggers can activate are:

*  Excessive platelet aggregation which can result in changes in blood vessels associated with migraines.

*  Decrease in the cellular energy reserves in the brain that are common to migraine sufferers.

NUTRITIONAL APPROACH – When Migraine Sufferers Get These 3 Factors Under Control – The Results Can Be Life Changing

1.  Maintain normal platelet aggregation
2.  Reduce or eliminate vasospasms
3.  Maintain normal mitochondrial energy reserve in the brain.
A Nutritional Approach to Migraine Control:  Riboflavin, Magnesium and Feverfew for maintaining normal cerebrovascular function.
All 3 of these ingredients are listed in the American Academy of Neurology’s Guidelines for Migraine Prevention.

Magnesium:  Research studies show that almost half of all migraine sufferers have low blood levels of Magnesium, which is critical in controlling vasospasms (the contraction and dilation of blood vessels in the brain which occurs during migraines).

Riboflavin:  Migraine sufferers also suffer mitochondrial energy deficiencies, which Riboflavin (Vitamin B2) can improve when given in high dosages.

Feverfew:  Research studies show Feverfew inhibits blood platelet aggregation and is anti-inflammatory.

For adults and children over the age of 2 who suffer migraines chronically, this combination is a great place to start and is a good alternative to the chronic use of NSAIDs like aspirin, and ibuprofen without the negative side-effects.

 
To the Best of Health,
Curt Hendrix, M.S., C.C.N., C.N.S.

MIGRELIEF.com

 

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